Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Mahogany Wild Rice Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette


This is an excellent side for grilled fish or chicken, or add tofu for a complete meal.

1/2 c. wild rice, cooked and chilled
1/2 c. grape tomatoes halved
1/2 c. cucumber slice and peeled
1/2 c. scallions, thinly sliced
1/3 c. olive oil
1/4 c. lemon juice
2 tsp. fresh parsley leaves
1/4 tsp. pepper


1. Cook wild rice according to package directions and allow to cool.

2. Whisk together oil, lemon juice, parsley salt and pepper in salad bowl. Add tomatoes, cucumbers, scallions and rice.

3. Stir gently to combine all ingredients.

4. Allow to sit and chill for at least 10 minutes. Serve chilled or room temperature.

2 comments:

Jude said...

So the mahogany's from the wild rice? Looks healthy and delicious.

asata (a.k.a. Life Chef) said...

You know Jude, I probably should have elaborated about Mahogany Wild Rice. It's a variety of wild rice that I picked up at a market one day, and when I finally got around to making it, I fell in love with it's nutty flavor and dense feeling. I especially liked the texture of the mahogany rice which had more of a chewiness than some harder varieties that I've commonly come across. Visually it makes for a stunning dish, much like the "forbidden" or black rice does. It is a deep brown to start with, and cooks up indigo or nearly black. This picture doesn't do it any justice b/c this picture just features a wild rice blend. The next time I cook up a batch I'll be sure to get a picture. It's beautiful stuff! If you can't find mahogany look for Black Japonica. According to Sundance Natural Foods Online:Black Japonica* - A blend of short grain black & medium grain mahogany rice, the seeds of which originated in Japan. It has a nutty mushroom-like flavor coupled with a subtle, sweet spiciness. Its dark color turns the cooking water a purplish brown. I will add, like most rices, you get a different turn out if you rinse the rice before cooking it, if you toast the rice before cooking it, or if you long-boil/simmer the rice. It's interesting how the outcome changes.